3rd grade math coloring pages

Published at Thursday, 5 March 2020.

Amateur house painters never had as much help as today. Scores of new paints and equipment placed on the market in the last few years make it possible for the weekend handyman to paint his own house almost as easily as a professional. From one-coat paints to disposable blowtorches, everything has been designed to make the job go faster, look better and cost less. OK, let's get started. Step one...supplies. You need a flat brush, a fan, a small detail brush and a couple of Filberts. A filbert is a rounded edge brush that lets you maneuver the paint easily without going outside the edges. Ultimately buy brushes that you like though, and make them work. Fans allow you to blend, for example. I use fans a lot and it's how I graduate color throughout my images. Everything I paint is by hand....no airbrushing or assistants. I want it to be an expression of me and nobody else. You also need an oil painting medium to mix with the oil paint to make it more fluid, and to speed or slow the drying process. Whichever you prefer. Go to the art store and don't be afraid to ask for help....they'll love helping you! A medium is merely an additive liquid which increases gloss, makes it flow easily, preserves the finish over time, keeps it from yellowing. I personally love Galkyd and Galkyd Lite. If that isn't available, buy a medium that looks like liquid amber and is kind of thick. Don't buy watery looking mediums....too hard to work with. If you decide to do your own body work discuss it with the paint shop first. They'll probably have recommendations on the type of primer you use. Some brands will be more compatible with their primers or color coats. The rule of thumb is to stay within the same brand of paint, both for prep and color. Even the cheapest paint shops typically use a brand name on their intermediate and higher paint jobs. Find out what it is and use the same brand as your primer coat. This will ensure you don't create adhesion problems for yourself down the road.

Now, decide WHAT you want to paint. Very important...you do NOT need to know how to draw. That's the great thing about painting, you can create even if you've never had a lesson. Don't get me wrong, art school is great. But don't let the lack thereof deter you from creating. You do not have to have a teacher to tell you how to create. You do need to know a few basic techniques, but from there let your imagination fly! When deciding what to paint, go to some websites about artists or Google famous artists to get inspired. Again, do not let a lack of training deter you from painting! Many of the great artists of the past had no training either. Many can't draw stick figures, but they can paint because the colors give you amazing options of expression! You may also go to my websites mentioned below or Google me to see all the crazy work I've created. My personal preference has been to create a large variety of work to keep it interesting and versatile. I did not want to be that artist who only painted one thing over and over. To me that's boring, and it should be boring to you too. Any known artist of the past has a vast variety of work. You'll also find that it makes it more interesting to you while you're doing it, because you won't ever get bored, you'll always be wondering how it'll turn out. Proper rolling technique: When rolling paint on the wall, get the roller skin evenly loaded with paint and make a V,N or M pattern on the wall, this is to spread the paint across the entire section you will be rolling, then roll back across the section and even out the paint. To properly "lay off" each section, make a final pass of the section applying light pressure to the roller frame arm end of the roller skin and bringing the nap mark (mark created on the pressure applied side of roller skin) across from the beginning of the section to the end of the section, and just repeat all the way down the wall.The V,N or M pattern, will be determine by how far the paint will spread, a V is for less spreading paint and M is for farther spreading paints. Do not "dry roll", which means trying to roll to much of a section at once with very little paint on the roller. Just as important, do not apply to much, if you find you are applying to much, increase the size of the section you are painting i.e. from a V pattern to an N or a N pattern to a M. Blue Dogs and the Legend of Loup Garou. In 1992, George Rodrigue, a Cajun artist from New Iberia, Louisiana, painted a series of paintings called The Blue Dog Pictures which were made popular by an advertising campaign done by Absolute Vodka. The blue dog has popped up in numerous other venues since then, but it wasn't created for commercial purposes. Rodrigue based his paintings on the Cajun legend of Loup Garou, the werewolf that is said to haunt the swamplands surrounding Acadiana and New Orleans. Parents teach their children morality lessons using the character and the commercial use of the blue dog has softened its image, but both Cajun and ancient American Indians still declare there's a factual basis for the story. Is there a werewolf in the bayou? You're not looking for perfection here, but you do want to eliminate every shiny spot of paint. When properly scuffed the paint should have a smooth, but dull matte finish.

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