Halloween coloring pages free print

Published at Sunday, 31 May 2020.

What colors are prevailing - tonal or local, warm or cold? Cold water paints of the casein type may be applied either directly to a plastered surface, or the surface may be first given a coat of primer-sealer to equalize uneven suction effects. The same is true of resin-emulsion paints, with the recommendations of the manufacturer of the product being given preference in case of doubt. Since resin-emulsion paints usually contain some oil in the binder, they should ordinarily be applied only to plaster which has dried thoroughly. How Much Paint You Really Need. How much paint you will need to satisfactorily complete a paint project is determined by 2 factors. The first, paint coverage, is a familiar concept to most people. It simply concerns the square footage of surface area to be painted, and "paint coverage calculators" abound on the web. However, the second concept, paint color coverage, has a much more pronounced effect on how much paint will be needed and the cost of paint projects. Unfortunately, paint color coverage is a novel concept to many painters and, in fact, is poorly understood even by many professionals. Knowing the secrets of paint color coverage will allow you to reduce the number coats you have to apply and minimize how much paint you have to buy.

The second part of preparation is surface prep, it addresses covering the surfaces you do not want to get any paint on. A little plastic sheeting will go along way to keeping paint off of floors, window coverings, handrails, cabinets, counter tops, etc... And, if you are not confident with your ability to paint a straight line next to door casing, baseboards, cabinets or hardware protect these surfaces using masking tape. There are two basic types of masking tape white/yellow and blue. The white tape sticks to surfaces better but, can pull off finishes on cabinets or stained woodwork. Blue tape usually will not pull off finishes but, does not stick as well, this will probably be the tape to use for most applications. Always wipe down or dust the surface you will be masking to assure the best tape adhesion possible. If you use blue tape you may need to re-rub down the tape before painting next to it, only mask off areas with blue tape that you will be painting for a given day. With either tapes, do not assume the are a force field that paint will not penetrate, use them as a reference and dry brush the paint next to the edge of the tape and avoid soaking the edge of the tape with a lot of paint, this will cause the paint to "bleed" through giving you an undesired look. If you will need to apply multiple coats of paint, on the first coat, paint as close to the tape as you can, not really getting paint on the tape. With the second coat or a one coat application, you can use the tape more of like a paint barrier and get a little more paint on the tape if you immediately remove each section of tape after painting the section, this will keep the paint from sitting on the tape and "bleeding" behind it. Also, if you get a lot of paint on the tape it is not good to let the paint dry on the tape because some paints (especially the glossier paints) will peel if allowed to dried, with the tape when it is pulled off. White tape should not be left on for longer than a couple of days and I suggest not leaving it on more than a day in areas that receive long periods of direct sunlight. Blue tape can be left on for days, if it will stay on, there again it does not stick as well and may need rubbed down again immediately before painting up next to it. Materials and their application, every paint manufacturers paint will vary. If you are freshening up old walls and painting back to the existing color, the product doesn't have to be high end or have good coverage. If you need to paint a dark color over light color or light color over dark, you may want to consider purchasing a top quality paint to avoid multiple coats. I suggest Valspar, Pittsburgh or Benjamin Moore top of the line wall paint. These brands work well for straight out of the bucket use and are application friendly. Sherwin Williams is not my first choice because the coverage is poor and you will have to apply multiple coats but, it does apply, fluently. If you find a product does not apply well, maybe it is to heavy and/or sagging on the wall, you may need to thin the paint with a little water, this will reduce the coverage but make the paint flow better and lay down nicer on the surface. I do recommend latex paints for all applications, these days a good high end latex is as good as oil paint and your tools clean up much easier, it will also be less harsh on the respiratory system. The only situation I recommend oil paint, is as a primer/stain blocker over stains that "bleed" through the paint. You can get a stain blocking oil primer in a convenient spray can and spot prime any trouble areas before painting and in the case you need to prime all of the wall due to smoke or water damage, I recommend getting it in gallons and rolling it on where the stains are present. Don't forget proper ventilation and/or a respirator when using the oil based primers! PRIMARY COLORS. The primary colors are red, yellow and blue. These colors are your base colors from which all other colors come from. Tools, there is a wide variety of brushes and rollers to choose from, it is critical to select quality tools and maintain them. We will discuss brushes first, I use and recommend only Purdy brand brushes, they will give you the best results in terms of coverage and make the project go much easier and quicker. A Purdy brush is a little more expensive but if kept clean promptly after each use and stored properly, it will last for years and many projects. Most any other brushes out there, especially the cheap ones, are made of far inferior hair and I liken them to using a hand (or whisk) broom to paint with. Using lower quality tools will only frustrate you and lead you to assume that you are incapable of painting. You are capable! and the proper tools, materials, and advise are all you need. If your painting project will be on going for a couple of days, you can wet the brush with paint, wrap the brush up in a plastic sandwich bag and tape the plastic bag to the handle above the metal ferrule. Sealing it up will keep it from drying out, storing it flat will maintain the shape and permit you to use it for a couple of days without cleaning it. Because, after a couple of days or if it has had extended use on a hot day, it will loose its shape and start to collect a lot of dried paint on the hair, you should clean it with warm water and a wire brush. Once you have ran some water through the brush hair, the wire brush will then be used to remove the dried paint from the hair. Always run the wire brush down the entire length of the hair and never across it, to prevent crimping and damaging the hair. After you get the brush clean, spin it between your two hands, shedding as much water as possible from it. Then, using the wire brush again, comb the hair, shape/style the hair with your hands and lay it flat to dry. Once dry, if you will not be using the paint brush again soon, protect it by storing it in the paper shuck/cover that it came in and it will be like new the next time you use it.

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